Keynotes

Keynotes

The AR/VR Renaissance: opportunities, pitfalls, and remaining problems

Prof. Henry Fuchs | Federico Gil Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Abstract: Augmented and virtual reality are hailed today as “the next big thing,” the next personal computing platform, logical successors to the previous three generations of PCs, laptops, and mobile.  Others worry that today’s AR and VR systems are not yet sufficiently advanced for mass adoption, that they are more like the 1990s Apple Newton than the 2007 Apple iPhone — exciting proofs of concept, but not yet useful nor cost-effective for most consumers. This talk will review the historical development of AR and VR technologies, and survey some representative current work, sample applications, and remaining problems. Current work with encouraging results include 3D scene capture and 3D reconstruction of dynamic, populated spaces; compact and wide field-of-view AR displays; low-latency and high-dynamic range AR display systems; and near-eye lightfield displays that may reduce the vergence-accommodation conflicts that plague current AR and VR display designs.

fuchs2014aBio: Henry Fuchs (PhD, Utah, 1975) is the Federico Gil Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering at UNC Chapel Hill, coauthor of over 200 papers, mostly on rendering algorithms (BSP Trees), graphics hardware (Pixel-Planes), head-mounted / near-eye and large-format displays, virtual and augmented reality, telepresence, medical and training applications. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, recipient of the 2013 IEEE VGTC Virtual Reality Career Award, and the 2015 ACM SIGGRAPH Steven Anson Coons Award.

space


space

Towards Large-scale Deployment of Intelligent Video Analytics Systems

Dr. Julien Lai | Director of the Applied DL team of NVIDIA APAC Region

Abstract: One of the grand challenges of AI is to understand video content. Applications are endless: video surveillance, self-driving cars, live video streaming, ad-placement, etc. Problem is that Deep Learning, which has been boosting modern AI, is computationally expensive. It’s even more challenging when it comes to live stream video. Chip manufacturers are continuously pushing the edge of current IC technology to achieve both high throughput/performance, and high power efficiency. Engineers have also applied techniques such as network pruning, low precision, and model compression, to further accelerate network inference. That is also why our team are building the NVIDIA DeepStream SDK, which simplifies development of high performance video analytics applications powered by deep learning. We have seen successful large-scale deployment of such intelligent video analytics systems, and we see this as an unstoppable trend.

jlaiBio: Dr. Junjie Lai received his bachelor and master degrees from Tsinghua University, and received his PhD degree from INRIA, France. His PhD research focused on GPU architecture study, performance analysis and optimization.

Dr. Lai is currently the director of the HPC software development and Applied Deep Learning team of NVIDIA APAC region. Besides leading the team, he is collaborating with developers from many well-known internet companies, to better accelerate their deep learning applications with NVIDIA GPUs. His primary focus now is to apply Deep Learning/Machine Learning techniques for various real-world problems in Computer Vision, Finance, etc.

space


space

Smart Streaming of Panoramic Video

Prof. Dah Ming Chiu | Research Professor of Chinese University of Hong Kong

Abstract: Due to recent advances in VR and AR technology and applications, more and more videos streamed on-line become 360 degree and 3D. This creates new challenges for video streaming when bandwidth is limited. Besides adapting video resolution to bandwidth, there is also opportunity to adapt what to stream to user attention, or content creator's wish for focus. This opens up exciting opportunities for interesting research. We will describe some existing work (industry seems to be leading the way in this space), and discuss our own efforts.

dmchiu14aBio: Dah Ming received undergraduate degree from Imperial College London, and PhD from Harvard University. After serving in industry (AT&T Bell Labs, DEC, Sun Microsystem), he joined CUHK in 2002 as a professor, and served as department chairman from 2009 to 2015.

 His recent research interests include Internet content distribution, data-driven modeling and analysis of large scale systems, and network economics. He has also worked on analyzing academic social networks, and mining insights on academic research trends and evaluation methodology. Dah Ming is an IEEE Fellow. He served as an Associate Editor for IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking from 2006 to 2011 and TPC member for many networking conferences. He was the general co-chair of ACM Sigcomm 2013 held in Hong Kong in August of 2013, with record breaking attendance.

space


space

"Talk Title: TBA"

Prof. Bo Li | Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

space


space

Measuring Subjective QoE for Interactive System Design in the Mobile Era – Lessons Learned Studying Skype Calls

Prof. Polly Huang | Professor at National Taiwan University

Abstract: As the proportion of the multimedia/game traffic over the Internet through wireless and mobile access rises and the world economy recovers slowly, the issue of streaming real-time content cost-effectively is ever more pressing. The key question to address here is how to satisfy more (paying) users given limited resources. Users switch to other services/games because they can't hear/see the content well, not because they detect the fine-grained changes in network loss, delay or jitter, so called Quality of Service (QoS). Over the years, the Internet engineers, although getting very good at designing for QoS, have overlooked the fact that users might not perceive the subtle quantitative difference in QoS metrics to the overall user experience. Towards a user-friendly, therefore economically healthy, mobile Internet, we see the need to measure, understand, and redesign various control mechanisms for quality of user experience (QoE), in addition to the QoS. Using Skype/SILK VoIP service as an example, we show how one (1) measures QoE of calls delivered of different QoS, (2) derives models that translate from QoS to QoE, and (3) exploits the model for a design that pleases the users more under the same resource constraint.

pollyhuang-in-office-smile-1Bio: Polly is a professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering of National Taiwan University (NTU EE). Polly received her PhD from USC (CS 1999) and her BS from NTU (Math 1993). Before returning to NTU, she spent the early days of her career at AT&T Labs-Research, ETH Zurich, and UCLA. Polly was also a visiting scientist at CSAIL MIT Fall 2013. Over the past 20+ years, Polly has random walked a number of projects under the big umbrella of network and system research, including multicast routing, network simulation, Internet measurement, performance modeling, QoS, sensor networking, indoor localisation, delay-tolerant networking, time synchronisation, mobile system, event/activity inference, ubiquitous and wearable computing, e-health, and etc. The experience has nurtured her interest in design, analysis, and applications of communication networks and systems in general. Her recent interest spans the following 2 areas: multimedia networking and mobile/sensor system. Polly has (co-)authored over 100 technical articles and over 10 US patents. She has served as a TPC member for a number of high-profile network/system conferences, including ACM Sensys, Mobisys, Sigcomm, Mobicom. She has also served as an associate editor of ACM TOSN, and currently an associate editor of ACM IMWUT. She is a member of the ACM and IEEE.

space


space

Universal Basic Income and the Future of Virtual Environments

Shun-Yun Hu | Co-Founder of Imonology Inc., Taiwan

space